May 2018 - Charlie

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May 2018 - Charlie

Posted 3:14 PM

 

                                                                     Charlie

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Meet “Charlie”, he is a 14year old Male/Neutered American Bulldog.  Charlie was a new patient in May that presented for a ruptured tumor on his anus. Dr. Grosser had us clean the area and use silver nitrate to try to prevent bleeding until the owner could come back on Tuesday for surgery to remove the tumor.  

Over the weekend Charlie developed diarrhea and Dr. Grosser treated him with antibiotics, probiotics and anti-diarrheal medication plus a bland diet. Charlie became very lethargic and the owner was very concerned. After 24hours he seemed to bounce back and was feeling better. Upon surgery day Charlie’s diarrhea had resolved and he was back to normal.

Dr. Grosser recommended radiographs of the chest prior to surgery based on Charlie’s advanced age. (Recommended for any pet over 8 years old). It is best medicine to make sure the chest is clear and the heart appears normal. Charlie’s preanesthetic bloodwork and radiographs were both normal. We induced him for surgery and began prepping him for surgery. The technician noticed an inverted nipple that was hard at the base.  We called the owner and recommended removal of the mammary gland as well. The owner gave us permission and Dr. Grosser proceeded with the surgery. The mammary gland was removed first since the other tumor was an anal tumor and considered a “dirty” surgery. 

Surgery was uneventful and Dr. Grosser was able to remove both tumors without any complications.  Charlie recovered well and was released later that day.

The mammary tumor was submitted to histopathology and came back as tubulopapillary mammary carcinoma. This is a type of breast tumor.

Surgery is the treatment of choice for breast cancer in dogs.  Approximately 50% of masses in mammary glands are malignant (cancerous). Prognosis depends on the tumor size, amount of tumors and if there is lymph node involvement.  Charlie does not have lymph node involvement but close clinical observation of the surgical site as well as other mammary glands and lymph nodes is advised.

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                                          inverted nipple

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